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STEM Tuesday
  • STEM Tuesday-- The Human Body -- Writing Tips & Resources
    STEM Tuesday– The Human Body — Writing Tips & Resources
    February 18, 2020 by
    A Place for Primary Sources Reading the books on this month’s booklist, the following quote from Carla Mooney’s HUMAN MOVEMENT: How the Body Walks, Runs, Jumps, and Kicks jumped out at me: “Primary sources come from people who were eyewitnesses to events. They might write about the event, take pictures, post short messages to social media or blogs, or record the event for radio or video. Why are primary sources important? Do you learn differently from primary sources than from secondary sources, which come from people who did not directly experience an event?” (p 41) What a great question! Nonfiction authors typically use a mix of both primary sources and secondary sources (which are created after an event and often summarize and synthesize primary sources) in their books. And this month’s booklist provides fodder for a rich discussion about primary sources and how they are used in narrative and expository nonfiction.   Primary sources in narrative STEM nonfiction Young writers...
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  • STEM Tuesday-- The Human Body -- In the Classroom
    STEM Tuesday– The Human Body — In the Classroom
    February 11, 2020 by
      This month we’re peeling back the layers to take a look inside the human body! In the body, trillions of unique cells work together to form the tissues, organs, and body systems that allow you to run and jump, laugh and cry, and feel pain and joy. The books we’re highlighting this month dive into how the body works to sustain life. They are a great starting point for different sciences activities and discussions in the classroom. Here are a few to try:   Science Comic: The Brain – The Ultimate Thinking Machine by Tory Woollcott and Alex Graudins Another title in this popular graphic novel series that focuses on science topics. Readers will explore the ultimate thinking machine – our own brain! How our brains evolved, how our brain controls our senses, how we remember things, and more. Discuss why it is important to know how your brain works....
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  • Body 2.0 cover
    STEM Tuesday– The Human Body — Book List
    February 4, 2020 by
    Heart and Soul  As Valentine’s Day approaches, let’s explore what makes our hearts go pitter-patter with these books featuring various aspects of human anatomy.  Superbugs Strike Back: When Antibiotics Fail by Connie Goldsmith  For a long time we thought we had infectious diseases licked. But now we’re not so sure. What happens when bacteria become resistant to antibiotics? Goldsmith explores the science of superbugs in a accessible style that will make readers take notice.   Will Puberty Last My Whole Life? REAL Answers to REAL Questions From Preteens About Body Changes, Sex, and Other Growing-Up Stuff by Julie Metzger, RN, Robert Lehman, and Lia Cerizo Nurse Julie Metzger answers the questions many preteen boys and girls have about their bodies.   Guy Stuff The Body Book for Boys by Cara Natterson and Micah Player Advice, tips, and facts from a pediatrician fill this book specifically for boys.      Guts...
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  • STEM Tuesday--Dinosaurs/Paleontology-- Interview with Author Karen Bush Gibson
    STEM Tuesday–Dinosaurs/Paleontology– Interview with Author Karen Bush Gibson
    January 28, 2020 by
    Welcome to STEM Tuesday: Author Interview & Book Giveaway, a repeating feature for the fourth Tuesday of every month. Go Science-Tech-Engineering-Math! Today we’re interviewing Karen Bush Gibson. She’s the author of Gutsy Girls Go For Science: Paleontologists. The book features the lives of five women paleontologists—Mary Anning, Mignon Talbot, Tilly Edinger, Zofia Kielan-Jaworowska, and Mary Leakey—who overcame obstacles to make breakthrough discoveries about ancient life. Mary Kay Carson: What’s the book about—and why did you chose to write it? Karen Bush Gibson: Imagine how cool it must be to discover something no one has seen for over 145 million years? Even more exciting is if your discovery is a puzzle piece in the history of living things. Gutsy Girls Go for Science: Paleontologists highlights some of the women who have accomplished this. I’ve always been fascinated by women who achieve great things, particularly in male-dominated fields. One of those fields is paleontology, in which...
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Christine Taylor Butler

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Biography

Christine Taylor-Butler has been a prolific consumer of public
libraries from an early age. A consummate tinkerer it was deemed
advisable she study engineering at MIT for job security. Years later she made a break for the corporate door and delved into children’s literature hoping to write stories about talking animals when a sneaky editor at Scholastic conned her into writing non-fiction for children. She’s been writing science books ever since, and is now also writing
science fiction (The Lost Tribes) which hides real science between the
pages. Christine lives in Kansas City, Missouri with her husband,
daughters and cats who think she’s both servant and head of their pride.